Why Can’t I See Well at Night?

Why Can’t I See Well at Night?


Halos and Glare: Why Can’t I See Well at Night?
Light is crucial for vision. It bounces off objects and enters your eyes, which allows you to see. But sometimes, it’s the source of vision problems, like halos or glare
.
Halos are bright circles that surround a light source, like headlights.
Glare is light that enters your eye and interferes with your vision.
They can be:
Uncomfortable When you try to see in too-bright light, you may squint and look away. Your eyes may tear up. Disabling Glare can sometimes hurt your vision. Light scatters inside your eye, and you can’t see sharp images. With disabling glare, the loss of contrast is often worse in dim, not bright, environments.


What Causes Them? Halos often show up when you’re in a dim or dark place.
Glare is more likely in the daytime. They're a normal response to bright lights, but deeper problems can also bring them on.
Causes include:
Cataracts Normally, the lens at the front of your eye is clear Light can pass through easily.
A cataract scatters rather than focuses light This blurs your vision Halos are a common symptom.
Glare might make you think that lights are too bright.

Common eye problems Your retina is the thin lining in the back of your eye. It plays a crucial role in vision. If light can’t focus on it, you may start to see halos or glare.
10 Ways to Reduce Glare
Glare is controlled by adjusting the light source or the surface reflecting it and by filtering light before it reaches the eyes. The following solutions seek to control glare in these ways.
1-Filter & diffuse light. Use filtered light instead of direct light, which causes the most glare. Diffuse light with lamp shades or globes, and use adjustable curtains or blinds on windows.
2-Adjust work areas. Make sure work surfaces have a dull or matte finish since shiny surfaces reflect light more. Even adjusting colors on walls and ceilings can add contrast and reduce glare in work areas.
3-Wear polarized lenses. Polarized glasses reduce glare in situations where bright light reflects off a shiny surface like water, snow, glossy printed paper or painted surfaces.
4-Look for anti-glare coatings. Anti-glare treatment can reduce glare at night and inside from computer screens and inside light. Ask your 5-ophthalmologist for the coating for prescription eyewear or purchase anti-glare safety glasses.
5-Adjust light level. Although light level does impact visual performance, it’s not always brighter light levels that are needed. Often, raising the overall light level can help with contrast and thus visibility.
6-Add a desk lamp. In some situations, adding a desk lamp for viewing paper documents helps significantly by illuminating the document while avoiding excessive light on the computer screen. Just make sure the lamp doesn’t cause additional glare off a computer monitor.
7-Use adjustable lighting. Make sure light is adjustable for dimness or brightness to suit the situation.
8-Let technology help. Use computer monitors with adjustable contrast settings, and change the background color on the computer screen to suit the lighting situation.
9-Consider placement of computers. Adjust the angle and placement of monitors to reduce glare from overhead lights. Ideally, place them at a right angle to all lighting sources, including windows.
Try foam seals & wrap-around glasses. Safety glasses with foam padding and wrap-around sunglasses and safety glasses help protect from side/angular glare, which can cause as much damage as direct sunlight.